Government of Canada launches $50-million coding program for young Canadians

So…

My students (and myself) should consider applying for this program heading into the 2017-2018 school year. I feel my Computer Science programs should be looking to do more “outside the box” projects and innovating our software development outside the traditional areas in most high school Computer Science programs (like video games). The program is described as…

Young Canadians will get the skills they need for the well-paying jobs of the future as a result of a $50-million program that gives them the opportunity to learn coding and other digital skills. The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, together with the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today launched CanCode, a new program that, over the next two years, will give 500,000 students from kindergarten to grade 12 the opportunity to learn the in-demand skills that will prepare them for future jobs. The program also aims to encourage more young women, Indigenous Canadians and other under-represented groups to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math. In addition, it will equip 500 teachers across the country with the training and tools to teach digital skills and coding. Many jobs today rely on the ability of Canadian workers to solve problems using digital skills. The demand for such skills will only intensify as the number of software and data companies increases—whether they sell music online or design self-driving cars, for example. That’s why the government is investing in the skills that prepare young Canadians for the jobs of tomorrow. This program is part of the Innovation and Skills Plan, a multi-year strategy to create well-paying jobs for the middle class and those working hard to join it.

  • You can find a link to the description here
  • And a link to the application here

 

One Final Programming Contest (or one to keep skills sharp over the summer)

So there have been a few programming competition opportunities this year and a final one for the year is available. For my graduating Computer Science students it could be one final one before the challenges of post-secondary Computer Science, or for my grade 10 and 11 Computer Science students, a chance to practice and improve for next year. A description and links to this contest are below:

The one-of-a-kind Internet Problem Solving Contest is here once again! We eagerly invite you to compete in IPSC 2017. Internet Problem Solving Contest is a yearly online programming competition. Besides normal algorithmic problems, IPSC often features unusual tasks such as processing images or sound, coding in esoteric languages, or even playing chess. The problems range from easy to very hard, so everyone is welcome to compete. You can participate in a team of up to three people, but we also have separate ranklists for individuals and secondary school students. You can use any programming language or even solve problems by hand. This year, IPSC takes place on Saturday, 8 July 2017 at 10:00-15:00 UTC. Visit here to register. While you’re waiting for IPSC 2017, you can also visit here to practice on problems from previous years of IPSC. If you like IPSC, help us spread the word! Tell your friends, classmates, coworkers, internet strangers, et cetera. Good luck in the contest, and have fun!