Hawaii to bring Computer Science to every high school

This week, the Hawaii legislature passed a bill that would expand access to computer science across the state. The legislation would require the Hawaii Department of Education to develop and implement a statewide computer science curriculum plan for K-12 public school students, ensure that each public high school offers at least one computer science course, and provides $500,000 to begin to develop and implement computer science teacher development programs with the Department of Education. And just yesterday, the Hawaii State Board of Education adopted new statewide standards for computer science education. Governor David Ige joined the Governors’ Partnership for K-12 Computer Science, stating his support in bringing computer science opportunities to students across Hawaii. In joining the partnership, governors pledge to prioritize computer science education in their states and through introducing computer science education in schools, state leaders are making an investment in their students’ futures. This legislation heads to the Governor’s desk this week where he is expected to sign it. Read the original article here

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Making ideas into reality at MIT’s ‘Future Factory’

Back in the 1980’s a laboratory of misfits foresaw our future. Touch screens, automated driving instructions, wearable technology and electronic ink were all developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a place they call the Media Lab. It’s a research lab and graduate school program that long ago outgrew its name. Today it’s creating technologies to grow food in the desert, control our dreams and connect the human brain to the internet. Come have a look at what we found in a place you could call– the Future Factory.

Read the entire article here

How Early Is Too Early to Teach Computer Science?

Parents and teachers are concerned about young kids getting too much screen time. Should they allow any? Will kids fall behind if they aren’t allowed much screen time? How and when should youngsters learn how to use computers, learn about computer science, and start developing skills that eventually lead to coding? These are all valuable competencies that will serve them well in the high-tech workplace someday. But do kids really need to start getting prepared for the jobs of the future as early as kindergarten? Good news for concerned adults: It is possible to teach computer science concepts to very young kids—without using computers at all! kidandcomputer

What is Computational Thinking?

Computational thinking (CT) is “thinking like a computer scientist.” It is the thinking and the skills involved in formulating a problem and expressing its solution(s) in such a way that a computer—human or machine—can carry out. Computational thinking is the foundation of computer science, and includes problem analysis and decomposition, algorithmic thinking and expression, functions and abstraction, and debugging. These may sound like complex concepts, but these are all skills that are well within the grasp of young kids to not only comprehend, but to enjoy.

Computational Thinking ‘Unplugged’

During gym, recess, or play time, adults can make fun challenges for kids that lay the foundation for coding skills. Here are a few examples:

  • Problem Analysis: Supply your kids with blocks, a piece of wood, balls and colored tape. Challenge them to use the blocks to build a ramp for the ball to roll down that will make the ball reach a line of tape that is placed a short distance away.
  • Algorithmic Thinking: Help your kids to describe, step by step, a simple task such as eating cereal. Without knowing it, they’ll be exploring important coding concepts like sequencing (put cereal in bowl and then put in milk), loops (chew each bite of cereal 20 times) and conditionals (if the bowl is empty, stop eating).
  • Patterns and Pattern Recognition: Make a sound pattern with rhythm instruments, or even more simply, with a pot and spoon. Start out by making a pattern that your child can copy back. BANG, BANG, tap, BANG, BANG, tap . . .

You may already be doing some of these with your kids already, without realizing that they are learning computational thinking.

A Solid Foundation Lasts Into Later Life

Why start kids early? Kids who take computer science classes later in school have a tremendous advantage if they’re already comfortable with core programming concepts such as algorithms and debugging. Developing these skills early gives them confidence to tackle harder and harder challenges as their education and life experiences progress.

Read the original article here