Computer Science Alumni

As a follow up to a previous post from this year, I want to start focusing some of my attention to highlighting the success of alumni from my Computer Science program. I have tried to maintain contact with several alumni who have gone on to great success in various fields of Computer Science, but as we know life is busy! This year, I hope to reconnect and expand the alumni page on this website as well as a recognition board here at the school. Here are a few photos from a few alumni dinners and other events from the past few years…

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$200 million a year for Computer Science

Today, the White House announced a $200 million per year commitment to computer science education in America’s schools. Unlike similar proposals in previous years, today’s action delivers funding to schools, immediately. Besides expanding access to computer science in schools that previously didn’t teach it, the funds promise to increase participation by women and underrepresented minorities. This funding will jumpstart efforts to ensure every student in every school has the opportunity to learn computer science as part of a well-rounded education. For advocates of increased access and diversity in CS, this is the culmination of years of momentum that began in classrooms, spread to entire school districts, and won the support of business leaders and elected officials globally. At a time when computing careers are the best-paying, fastest-growing, and largest sector of new wages, impacting every industry in every state, it is no longer acceptable for our schools to limit access to this foundational subject. Our children deserve a level playing field — the opportunity to learn computer science shouldn’t be limited by the color of a student’s skin or the neighborhood she lives in. The UK, Japan, Ireland, and a dozen other countries have announced plans to add computer science to their school curriculum. It is unacceptable for the U.S. to lag behind. The country that invented the personal computer, the Internet, and the smartphone should also lead in computer science. And today, America leads in computer science, thanks to countless supporters of this cause, starting with you: parents, students, and teachers, as well as partner organizations and local governments. Whether you signed a petition on Code.org or used our courses in your classroom, you’ve helped build a grassroots movement that is changing education, globally. The division in our country hurts us all. Amidst the politics, America’s students represent our hope. We all want opportunity for our children, and there’s no better way to offer them opportunity than to prepare them for the careers of the future. This movement has supporters across the political spectrum, whether in urban, suburban, or rural communities. 90% of parents support computer science in schools. Americans may be divided by our politics, but we’re united by our dedication to our children. We all believe in opportunity and the American Dream. Code.org has never endorsed any candidate, politician, or political party. We’ve worked closely with presidents and governors from both parties, and with international prime ministers, to advocate for opportunity. Like many others, we’re appalled by the divisiveness in today’s politics, at a time when we need collaborative solutions to the world’s problems. Given our education focus, we’re dismayed by proposed cuts to education budgets. And given our mission and focus on diversity, we unequivocally denounce the tone of racism that has entered the political sphere. Today we have a chance to set aside politics and come together, to support opportunity for all our youth, and to build our nation’s future. For those of us who have spent years working to spread computer science, today’s announcement marks a new beginning — it’s a new opportunity for every school to expand its computer science offerings. This work is only just beginning, and the job won’t be done until every state and school district in America steps up to teach high-quality computer science. To the 600,000 Code.org teachers who have helped make computer science the fastest-spreading subject in modern education, I want to thank you for your passion. And I encourage every educator to consider joining the computer science movement. Your students are our future. Whether you teach your students to add and subtract, to read and write, or to code, yours is the most important job in the world. Today marks a special moment for every parent, student, teacher, or partner organization who believes in our mission, that every student in every school deserves the opportunity to learn computer science. To all of you who have supported Code.org, today’s announcement is about something bigger than any politician or political agenda: it’s about our children and their future, and it’s about you, and the strength of our global movement for students. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart. Hadi Partovi, Code.org (read the original here)

South Carolina high schools could require computer coding course for graduation

Want a high school diploma? You might need to learn a little bit of JavaScript. All South Carolina public schools could require computer-science training for graduation starting as soon as 2019. A bill advancing out of the state House of Representatives would create new standards for computer science education in grades 9-12, set up summer training for new teachers in the field and require that every high school in the state offer at least one computer science course. The state currently requires one credit of “computer science” for a high school diploma, but that credit can be for a keyboarding class — a far cry from the rigorous and standards-based courses that some state lawmakers say would give students a leg up as they enter an increasingly knowledge-based workforce. “At this rate, we’ll be ahead of the curve,” said Valerie Sessions, chair of the Computer Science Department at Charleston Southern University. She recently signed an open letter in support of the bill along with leaders from Boeing, Google and Bibliolabs. House Bill 3427, the SC Computer Science Education Initiative, passed in the House with a 106-1 vote Tuesday and advanced to the Senate. It includes $1.36 million in new expenditures over the next two years to develop grade-appropriate standards, hire a state computer science education coordinator, fund summer teacher training camps and provide other support. But the bill does not set aside recurring funds to support computer science education or provide school districts with more money to hire additional teachers. The hiring of computer science teachers could cost local school districts a combined $19.2 million in the 2019-20 school year alone, according to an estimate included with the bill. Quinn Burke, an assistant professor of education at the College of Charleston, helped write computer science standards for kindergarten through eighth grade. When it comes to the high school proposal, he’s concerned about the lack of recurring funds for teachers. “To be offering computer science education in South Carolina schools for 2019 but putting absolutely no money behind it — that’s a tremendous problem,” Burke said. “I have concerns that if it’s not properly funded and supported, by 2020 we’ll be scratching our heads saying, ‘This was a waste, it was ill-conceived.'” But if it works, Burke said, students will be prepared for all sorts of tech-centric careers. Some districts already teach block-based introductory coding languages in elementary school. By the time students leave high school, they could have the tools to learn new languages and thrive in whatever environment awaits them. The earlier the head start, the better. “Kids are a lot more willing to tinker at things for longer periods of time, whereas adults, their concentration level peters out,” Burke said. Read the original article here