Melinda Gates is doubling down on women in tech

 

Melinda Gates wants to put her muscle behind getting more women in tech.

Gates has focused much of her work on the well-being of women and girls around the globe — but this issue hits particularly close to home. Gates, a computer science graduate, joined Microsoft in 1987. She eventually married its founder Bill Gates, and the two launched the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in 2000. Gates is now creating a “personal office” devoted to bringing more women into tech, according to an interview with Jessi Hempel at BackChannel. It’s early in the process, and Gates is still figuring out the best way to get involved. She said she’s currently in “learning mode,” and looking at everything from education to venture capital funding for women. One thing is evident: Gates said data will play a big role in approaching the issue. Gates cited the fact that just 18% of women are earning computer science undergrad degrees in the U.S. That has fallen significantly from the 1980s, when women received 38% of the degrees. “Every company needs technology, and yet we’re graduating fewer women technologists. That is not good for society. We have to change it,” she said.

Related: Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science nears gender parity 

She added that her office looked into the number of patents received by female inventors. “Four decades ago, 3% of all patents listed at least one woman inventor. As of 2010, nearly 19% of patents did,” she said. While that shows a clear improvement, she said her team’s projections didn’t see parity until 2092. In recent years, companies like Google (GOOG), Facebook (FB, Tech30), Apple (AAPL, Tech30),Microsoft (MSFT, Tech30) have released annual reports on workforce diversity in a bid to be more transparent. But there’s been very little progress. Microsoft’s 2015 report showed that its percentage of female employees actually declined from 29% to 26.8%. It cited massive layoffs as the reason. The transparency is, however, a start. And Gates notes that there hasn’t been a lot of research or money devoted to the issue previously. “In the tech space, men don’t really see a problem and a lot of the money is held by men,” she said.

Related: Melinda Gates: ‘Poverty is sexist’

It’s not difficult to understand why tech products and services would benefit from a more inclusive workforce. In an interview with CNN’s Poppy Harlow last week, Gates also stressed the importance of diversity. “We know that more diverse teams put out a better product,” she said. This goes for people of color as well, which Gates also noted in her interview with Hempel. Gates cited Apple’s health app as an example of a product that has a “blatant error.” It didn’t include period tracking. Gates stressed that she was “not picking on Apple at all,” but “it’s just an example of all the things we can leave out for women.” Read the original article here

The History of Video Games…

Can you name the first video game? The first game likely was Tennis for Two in 1958 but it could be Space Wars! in 1962 or other games. It’s complicated.Probably the most interesting part of video game history is the role of play and fun in computer science history. For example, Claude Shannon and others built simple electro-mechanical mice with mazes and mechanical Turks to explore ideas about artificial intelligence. While video games we know were not available to the public until the 1970s, games have been a big part of serious scientific research into military strategy, human-computer interaction, and adaptive learning.Another interesting aspect is how little early researchers cared to save their work once their work was done. Many early games from computer science research and university computer labs were saved by accident or destroyed. What Was the First Computer Video Game? The answer depends on whether you mean games available to the public, in bars as an arcade game, or limited to university computer labs. Read more here.